French relations with francophone Africa
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French relations with francophone Africa a case study of linkage politics in the post-colonial era by Elizabeth Evatt Traxler

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Published by University Microfilms International in Ann Arbor, Mich .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Microform reproduction of thesis (Ph.D.) - University of South Carolina, 1982.

StatementElizabeth Evatt Traxler.
The Physical Object
Pagination6 microfiches
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21205318M

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The fourteen countries in west and equatorial Africa that formed the heart of what was once France's African colonial empire - all independent now for more than four decades - still retain French as an official language, remain attached to French culture, and maintain political links with France. Each country, however, has developed its own distinctive brand of politics.   Francophone African books are still very often published by French imprints, which can make them hard to get at home. But there is a growing push for change.   Mukonoweshuro, Eliphas G. "French Commercial Interests in Non-Francophone Africa." Africa Quarterly –2 (): 13– Stefano Recchia & Thierry Tardy () "French military operations in Africa: Reluctant multilateralism," Journal of Strategic Studies. Besides special trade relations between France and Africa, the French do not hesitate to exploit Africa economically. It is the case when they intervene in Africa’s monetary policy or when they exploit Africa’s natural ressources. Some people even denounce that France gets .

"60 years on, francophone countries in Africa still do not have true independence and freedom from France," says Nathalie Yamb, adviser to Ivory Coast's Freedom and Democracy Party (LIDER).   As most Francophone African countries celebrate their 55 years of independence this year, this may be a good time to reassess relations between them and France.   French Politicians thought that France-Africa relations had to be kept on the front line in a sustainable way. They were very effective in the international arena with the support of affiliated states. Therefore, close personal ties between the French President and African leaders came to the forefront at the heart of Franco-African relations.   Given the secretive nature of Franco-African relations at elite levels – especially the machinations of the African advisory ‘Cells’ in the French presidency (Marchal, p and p), and lack of public oversight in development and private/public corporate involvement (ibid, p) – it is little wonder this environment is deemed ripe.

/ Martin Shipway --A vocation for independence: Guinean nationalism in the s / Mairi MacDonald --French officials and the insecurities of change in sub-Saharan Africa: Dakar, 19 August revisited / Alexander Keese --"Saving French West Africa": the French army, African soldiers and military propaganda during the s / Ruth Ginio. He is the winner of the Grand Prix de la Littérature , and has received the Subsaharan African Literature Prize and the Prix Renaudot. He was selected by the French journal Lire as one of the fifty writers to watch out for this coming century. His previous books include African Psycho, Broken Glass Memoirs of a Porcupine and Black Bazaar.   The fourteen countries in west and equatorial Africa that formed the heart of what was once France s African colonial empire all independent now for more than four decades still retain French as an official language, remain attached to French culture, and maintain political links with France. French military units were almost immediately pulled out. France, although apparently willing to maintain cooperative relations, was overlooked as Algeria, eager to exploit its new independence, looked to other trade partners. Shortly afterward, Algerian interest in resuming French-Algerian relations resurfaced.